Hacked baby rhino recovers

baby rhino NtombiThe baby rhino that was hacked with axes and machetes earlier is doing miraculously great. She’s been nursed back to health at the Rhino Orphan Response Project, which is part of the Endangered Wildlife Trust. Ntombi, as she is named, loves playing in the mud and…running! Read the story, watch the video’s…

The only thing the little rhino wanted to do was return to her mother. But the poachers who were hacking the horn of mama’s face after killing her found the calf a nuisance and didn’t want her close. So to chase her away they again turned to violence near Mokopane in South Africa. They slashed at her face with a panga and axes repeatedly.

The two months old was found with 18 very deep lacerations across her face, one which cut right through her stump and the other through her skull. She  is now being cared for at a special orphanage for baby rhinos near Mokopane and has made a remarkable discovery. Ntombi spends lots of time out in the bush doing normal rhino things, which is a critical part of her rehabilitation. Here are two joyous video’s of the little one when taken on a walk. Run Ntombi, run!

 

 

The rhino is fighting for its existence. Last year poachers slaughtered a record of 668 of them in South Africa, where the largets rhino population lives.  There is an enormous surge in poaching because of the rising demand of rhino horn on the Asian, and especially the chinese, black market. Traditional medicinal beliefs tell  that the material can cure several illnesses. with cancer as one of them. As the population in Asia is getting wealthier, more people want to get their hands on rhino horn, which is proven to be of the same material as human nails and thus has no medicinal value what so ever.

To find more informatie on the work of the Endangered Wildlife Trust, you can visit the EWT website . You can also donate to contribute to their conservation work.

The video’s of Ntombi are made by conservationist Karen Trendler, who developed the ‘Orphaned Rhino Response Project’ in South Africa to rehabilitate rhino calves whose mothers were killed by poachers.

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